Work with thought leaders and academic experts in general neuroscience

Companies can greatly benefit from collaborating with academic researchers whose expertise is in General Neuroscience. These researchers can provide valuable insights into the workings of the brain, helping companies understand consumer behavior, develop innovative products, and create effective marketing strategies. By leveraging their knowledge of neural processes, academic researchers can assist in optimizing user experiences, conducting neuroimaging studies, and designing experiments to test the efficacy of interventions. Additionally, they can contribute to the development of neurotechnologies, such as brain-computer interfaces and neurofeedback systems. Overall, partnering with General Neuroscience academic researchers can give companies a competitive edge by unlocking the potential of the human brain.

Experts on NotedSource with backgrounds in general neuroscience include Yseult Héjja-Brichard, Ph.D., Daniel Milej, Ph.D., Regan Hamel, Sheed Itaman, Edoardo Airoldi, Azeezat Azeez, Nora S Vyas, Ph.D., Taryn A. Myers, Ph.D., Norman Farb, Dr. Christian Waugh, Ph.D., Giuliana Noratto, K. Suzanne Scherf, Fadhel Kaboub, and Aminda J. O'Hare.

Yseult Héjja-Brichard, Ph.D.

Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America

Daniel Milej, Ph.D.

London, Ontario, Canada
Ph.D. in biomedical engineering
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (37)
Biomedical Optics
NIRS
fNIRS
Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy
CBF
And 32 more
About
Dr. Daniel Milej is a multidisciplinary researcher with experience in medical biophysics, electronics, biocybernetics, biomedical optics and engineering. He is highly knowledgeable and experienced in a range of research techniques. He is currently a Research Associate at the Lawson Health Research Institute, leading the transition of multimodal optical imaging systems from a research setting to clinical use in an ICU and OR environment, working closely with teams of nurses, surgeons, doctors and respiratory therapists. Previously he was a postdoctoral fellow working on developing noninvasive modalities for brain activity monitoring in the Department of Medical Biophysics at Western University. Before that, Dr. Milej worked as a researcher at the Nalecz Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering. He obtained his Ph.D. in 2014 from the Polish Academy of Science, specializing in Electronics and Biomedical Engineering. He received his MSc from the Military University of Technology in 2008.
Most Relevant Publications (3+)

91 total publications

Perfusion and Metabolic Neuromonitoring during Ventricular Taps in Infants with Post-Hemorrhagic Ventricular Dilatation

Brain Sciences / Jul 15, 2020

Rajaram, A., Yip, L. C. M., Milej, D., Suwalski, M., Kewin, M., Lo, M., Carson, J. J. L., Han, V., Bhattacharya, S., Diop, M., de Ribaupierre, S., & St. Lawrence, K. (2020). Perfusion and Metabolic Neuromonitoring during Ventricular Taps in Infants with Post-Hemorrhagic Ventricular Dilatation. Brain Sciences, 10(7), 452. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10070452

Assessing Time-Resolved fNIRS for Brain-Computer Interface Applications of Mental Communication

Frontiers in Neuroscience / Feb 18, 2020

Abdalmalak, A., Milej, D., Yip, L. C. M., Khan, A. R., Diop, M., Owen, A. M., & St. Lawrence, K. (2020). Assessing Time-Resolved fNIRS for Brain-Computer Interface Applications of Mental Communication. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 14. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00105

Using fMRI to investigate the potential cause of inverse oxygenation reported in fNIRS studies of motor imagery

Neuroscience Letters / Jan 01, 2020

Abdalmalak, A., Milej, D., Cohen, D. J., Anazodo, U., Ssali, T., Diop, M., Owen, A. M., & St. Lawrence, K. (2020). Using fMRI to investigate the potential cause of inverse oxygenation reported in fNIRS studies of motor imagery. Neuroscience Letters, 714, 134607. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2019.134607

Regan Hamel

Cambridge
Senior bioinformatics scientist, specializing in single cell omics in the context of cellular reprogramming and neuroinflammation
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (17)
single cell biology
transcriptomics
Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Cell Biology
Developmental Biology
And 12 more
About
Regan Hamel has an MPhil and PhD in Clinical Neurosciences from University of Cambridge. She also has a Bachelor of Science in Neurosciences from McGill University. Her PhD with Stefano Pluchino and John Marioni focused on single cell transcriptomics in the context of neuroinflammation. Since 2021 she has worked as a Bioinformatics scientist at Mogrify Ltd, applying a multitude of computational biology techniques (including single cell omics, bulk RNAseq, and predictive modelling) in the context of cell reprogramming
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

12 total publications

Characterization of Human iPSC-derived Spinal Motor Neurons by Single-cell RNA Sequencing

Neuroscience / Dec 01, 2020

Thiry, L., Hamel, R., Pluchino, S., Durcan, T., & Stifani, S. (2020). Characterization of Human iPSC-derived Spinal Motor Neurons by Single-cell RNA Sequencing. Neuroscience, 450, 57–70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2020.04.041

Single cell biology—a Keystone Symposia report

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences / Oct 03, 2021

Cable, J., Elowitz, M. B., Domingos, A. I., Habib, N., Itzkovitz, S., Hamidzada, H., Balzer, M. S., Yanai, I., Liberali, P., Whited, J., Streets, A., Cai, L., Stergachis, A. B., Hong, C. K. Y., Keren, L., Guilliams, M., Alon, U., Shalek, A. K., Hamel, R., … Romeike, M. (2021). Single cell biology—a Keystone Symposia report. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1506(1), 74–97. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.14692

Edoardo Airoldi

Professor of Statistics & Data Science Temple University & PI, Harvard University
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (57)
Statistics
Causal Inference
Network Science
Statistical Machine Learning
Computational Biology
And 52 more
About
Edoardo Airoldi is a Professor in the Department of Machine Learning at Temple University. He is also the Director of the Center for Machine Learning and Health. He is a world-renowned expert in the fields of machine learning and artificial intelligence, with a focus on applications to health. Airoldi is a member of the prestigious Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the International Machine Learning Society (IMLS). He has published over 200 papers in leading journals and conferences, and his work has been covered by various media outlets including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, and Wired.
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

106 total publications

Musashi proteins are post-transcriptional regulators of the epithelial-luminal cell state

eLife / Nov 07, 2014

Katz, Y., Li, F., Lambert, N. J., Sokol, E. S., Tam, W.-L., Cheng, A. W., Airoldi, E. M., Lengner, C. J., Gupta, P. B., Yu, Z., Jaenisch, R., & Burge, C. B. (2014). Musashi proteins are post-transcriptional regulators of the epithelial-luminal cell state. ELife, 3. CLOCKSS. https://doi.org/10.7554/elife.03915

A computational approach to map nucleosome positions and alternative chromatin states with base pair resolution

eLife / Sep 13, 2016

Zhou, X., Blocker, A. W., Airoldi, E. M., & O’Shea, E. K. (2016). A computational approach to map nucleosome positions and alternative chromatin states with base pair resolution. ELife, 5. CLOCKSS. https://doi.org/10.7554/elife.16970

Azeezat Azeez

San Francisco , California, United States of America
Postdoctoral Fellow, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford School of Medicine
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (10)
Neuroimaging
Data science
resting-state fMRI
Biological Psychiatry
Pharmacology
And 5 more
About
Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. with extensive research experience in neuroimaging including five publications. Experience teaching and tutoring. Knowledge in algorithm development, testing, and data analysis. Acquiring skills in data science and applied methods of machine learning
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

7 total publications

Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy (SAINT-TRD) induces rapid remission from treatment-resistant depression in a double-blinded, randomized, and controlled trial.

Brain Stimulation / Nov 01, 2020

Phillips, A. L., Cole, E. J., Bentzley, B. S., Stimpson, K. H., Nejad, R., Tischler, C., Barmak, F., Veerapal, C., Khan, N., Cherian, K., Felber, E., Brown, R., Choi, E., Bishop, J., Azeez, Ph. D. A., Coetzee, J., Rapier, R., Odenwald, N., Carreon, D., … Williams, N. R. (2020). Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy (SAINT-TRD) induces rapid remission from treatment-resistant depression in a double-blinded, randomized, and controlled trial. Brain Stimulation, 13(6), 1859–1860. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brs.2020.06.071

Nora S Vyas, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Mental Health, with interest in civic engagement and partnerships
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (26)
Psychosis
neuroimaging
neuropsychology
mindfulness
neurodevelopmental disorders
And 21 more
About
Dr Nora S Vyas is an Associate Professor in Psychology at the Department of Psychology, Kingston University. She joined Kingston University in 2012, and previously held a Senior Lecturer position at Middlesex University. Dr Vyas completed her PhD in psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), University of London in 2008. Following her PhD, she worked at the Child Psychiatry Branch, National Institutes of Health (Washington DC, USA) as a Lindemann Trust Fellow (English-Speaking Union), preceded by a Fulbright Distinguished Fellowship in 2010. Dr Vyas teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate level in child/adolescent and adult mental health, health psychology, and clinical/cognitive neuroscience. Her research focuses on using clinical, cognitive, and imaging techniques to study individuals with serious mental health problems such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. She applies these skills in other fields such as oncology and mindfulness. Her research specialism is early-onset psychosis, and she has published her work widely.
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

30 total publications

The use of PET imaging in studying cognition, genetics and pharmacotherapeutic interventions in schizophrenia

Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics / Jan 01, 2011

Vyas, N. S., Patel, N. H., Nijran, K. S., Al-Nahhas, A., & Puri, B. K. (2011). The use of PET imaging in studying cognition, genetics and pharmacotherapeutic interventions in schizophrenia. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 11(1), 37–51. https://doi.org/10.1586/ern.10.160

What insights can we gain from studying early-onset schizophrenia? The neurodevelopmental pathway and beyond

Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics / Aug 01, 2010

Vyas, N. S., Kumra, S., & Puri, B. K. (2010). What insights can we gain from studying early-onset schizophrenia? The neurodevelopmental pathway and beyond. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 10(8), 1243–1247. https://doi.org/10.1586/ern.10.109

Taryn A. Myers, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology with publications in risk and protective factors for body image concerns and disordered eating
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (19)
Body Image
Eating Disorders
Feminist Beliefs
Clinical Psychology
Psychiatry and Mental health
And 14 more
About
Dr. Taryn A. Myers earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Kent State University, where she served as a Teaching Fellow and Assistant Director of the Psychological Clinic. She received her B.A. in Psychology with an interdisciplinary minor in Women's and Gender Studies from Kenyon College. A native Midwesterner, Dr. Myers completed her clinical residency at the Medical College of Georgia and the Charlie Norwood Veteran's Affairs Medical Center prior to moving to Hampton Roads in 2010. She chose to come to Virginia Wesleyan because of her passion for teaching and the liberal arts. Dr. Myers' research interests include risk and protective factors for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating. She enjoys integrating stories from her clinical work and findings from her research into her teaching to make the material come alive for students. She also engages in editorial activities for such journals as Body Image and Sex Roles. In addition, Dr. Myers enjoys sharing her research with students through independent projects and encourages them to present their work at state and national conferences. Dr. Myers is currently serving as Chair of Psychology as well as Chair of Special Interest Groups of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT). She is the 2017 recipient of an Early Career Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association, the 2018 recipient of the Samuel Nelson Gray Distinguished Teaching award from VWU, and the 2019 recipient of the ABCT Women's Issues Special Interest Group Early Career Award.
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

21 total publications

Aβ40 is associated with cognitive function, body fat and physical fitness in healthy older adults

Nutritional Neuroscience / Oct 01, 2007

Leahey, T. M., Myers, T. A., Gunstad, J., Glickman, E., Spitznagel, M. B., Alexander, T., & Juvancic-Heltzel, J. (2007). Aβ40 is associated with cognitive function, body fat and physical fitness in healthy older adults. Nutritional Neuroscience, 10(5–6), 205–209. https://doi.org/10.1080/10284150701676156

Norman Farb

Associate Professor at University of Toronto - Mississauga
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (39)
Mindfulness- Emotion - Affect - Attention - Neuroscience - Interoception
Cognitive Neuroscience
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
General Medicine
General Psychology
And 34 more
About
Norman Farb, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, where he directs the Regulatory and Affective Dynamics laboratory (www.radlab.zone). He studies the psychology of well-being, focusing on mental habits, such as how we think about ourselves and interpret our emotions. He is particularly interested in why people differ in their resilience to stress, depression, and anxiety. Prof. Farb's work currently explores online training to support wellbeing, as well as neuroimaging to understand how emotional reactions predict mental health over the lifespan.
Most Relevant Publications (6+)

96 total publications

Emotions: form follows function

Current Opinion in Neurobiology / Jun 01, 2013

Farb, N. A., Chapman, H. A., & Anderson, A. K. (2013). Emotions: form follows function. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 23(3), 393–398. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2013.01.015

Can neuroimaging inform economic theories of decision making?

Neuroscience and Neuroeconomics / Jan 01, 2013

Farb, N. (2013). Can neuroimaging inform economic theories of decision making? Neuroscience and Neuroeconomics, 1. https://doi.org/10.2147/nan.s39339

Towards a neuroimaging biomarker of depression vulnerability

Translational Neuroscience / Jan 01, 2011

Farb, N., Segal, Z., & Anderson, A. (2011). Towards a neuroimaging biomarker of depression vulnerability. Translational Neuroscience, 2(4). https://doi.org/10.2478/s13380-011-0033-2

Eye Movements and White Matter are Associated with Emotional Control in Children Treated for Brain Tumors

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society / May 27, 2020

Moxon-Emre, I., Taylor, M. J., Farb, N. A. S., Oyefiade, A. A., Taylor, M. D., Bouffet, E., Laughlin, S., Skocic, J., de Medeiros, C. B., & Mabbott, D. J. (2020). Eye Movements and White Matter are Associated with Emotional Control in Children Treated for Brain Tumors. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 26(10), 978–992. https://doi.org/10.1017/s1355617720000491

Interoceptive Awareness of the Breath Preserves Attention and Language Networks amidst Widespread Cortical Deactivation: A Within-Participant Neuroimaging Study

eneuro / Jun 01, 2023

Farb, N. A. S., Zuo, Z., & Price, C. J. (2023). Interoceptive Awareness of the Breath Preserves Attention and Language Networks amidst Widespread Cortical Deactivation: A Within-Participant Neuroimaging Study. Eneuro, 10(6), ENEURO.0088-23.2023. https://doi.org/10.1523/eneuro.0088-23.2023

A machine learning approach towards the differentiation between interoceptive and exteroceptive attention

European Journal of Neuroscience / May 24, 2023

Zuo, Z. X., Price, C. J., & Farb, N. A. S. (2023). A machine learning approach towards the differentiation between interoceptive and exteroceptive attention. European Journal of Neuroscience, 58(2), 2523–2546. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.16045

Dr. Christian Waugh, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology with expertise in resilience, positive emotions, stress
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (44)
Emotion
stress
fMRI
psychophysiology
Sociology and Political Science
And 39 more
About
Christian Waugh, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology at Wake Forest University, NC, is an expert in the study of stress resilience, emotions, and effective coping habits. His research features resilience as the result of stress, trauma, and the ability to experience positive emotions in times of stress. Dr. Waugh has been twice honored for teaching excellence at Wake Forest, is a professional speaker, and has published several dozen scientific articles.
Most Relevant Publications (4+)

78 total publications

Anxiety and initial value dependence in startle habituation

Psychophysiology / Apr 12, 2022

Faunce, J. A., Blumenthal, T. D., & Waugh, C. E. (2022). Anxiety and initial value dependence in startle habituation. Psychophysiology, 59(10). Portico. https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.14071

DeCon: A tool to detect emotional concordance in multivariate time series data of emotional responding

Biological Psychology / Apr 01, 2014

Bulteel, K., Ceulemans, E., Thompson, R. J., Waugh, C. E., Gotlib, I. H., Tuerlinckx, F., & Kuppens, P. (2014). DeCon: A tool to detect emotional concordance in multivariate time series data of emotional responding. Biological Psychology, 98, 29–42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.10.011

Cardiovascular and affective recovery from anticipatory threat

Biological Psychology / May 01, 2010

Waugh, C. E., Panage, S., Mendes, W. B., & Gotlib, I. H. (2010). Cardiovascular and affective recovery from anticipatory threat. Biological Psychology, 84(2), 169–175. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2010.01.010

Endogenous testosterone levels are associated with amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex responses to anger faces in men but not women

Biological Psychology / May 01, 2009

Stanton, S. J., Wirth, M. M., Waugh, C. E., & Schultheiss, O. C. (2009). Endogenous testosterone levels are associated with amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex responses to anger faces in men but not women. Biological Psychology, 81(2), 118–122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2009.03.004

Giuliana Noratto

Food Scientist PhD and Registered Dietician - Texas A&M University
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (40)
Food Science
human nutrition
disease prevention and treatment
Nutrition
Human Health
And 35 more
About
Dr. Giuliana Noratto is a senior associate research scientist at Texas A&M AgriLife. She received her Ph.D. in food science and technology from Texas A&M University System, and her M.Sc. in food science and technology from Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. She also holds a B.S. in food science and technology from Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. Dr. Noratto’s research interests include food safety and quality, sensory science, and food processing.
Most Relevant Publications (3+)

91 total publications

Different analysis strategies of 16S rRNA gene data from rodent studies generate contrasting views of gut bacterial communities associated with diet, health and obesity

PeerJ / Nov 17, 2020

Garcia-Mazcorro, J. F., Kawas, J. R., Licona Cassani, C., Mertens-Talcott, S., & Noratto, G. (2020). Different analysis strategies of 16S rRNA gene data from rodent studies generate contrasting views of gut bacterial communities associated with diet, health and obesity. PeerJ, 8, e10372. Portico. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.10372

Effect of dark sweet cherry powder consumption on the gut microbiota, short-chain fatty acids, and biomarkers of gut health in obese db/db mice

PeerJ / Jan 03, 2018

Garcia-Mazcorro, J. F., Lage, N. N., Mertens-Talcott, S., Talcott, S., Chew, B., Dowd, S. E., Kawas, J. R., & Noratto, G. D. (2018). Effect of dark sweet cherry powder consumption on the gut microbiota, short-chain fatty acids, and biomarkers of gut health in obese db/db mice. PeerJ, 6, e4195. Portico. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.4195

Influence of whole-wheat consumption on fecal microbial community structure of obese diabetic mice

PeerJ / Feb 15, 2016

Garcia-Mazcorro, J. F., Ivanov, I., Mills, D. A., & Noratto, G. (2016). Influence of whole-wheat consumption on fecal microbial community structure of obese diabetic mice. PeerJ, 4, e1702. Portico. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1702

K. Suzanne Scherf

Associate Professor of Psychology & Neuroscience, Penn State University
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (41)
developmental cognitive neuroscience
vision
autism
adolescent
Cognitive Neuroscience
And 36 more
About
My core interests lie in understanding how children and adolescents perceive and interpret social signals and how emerging functional specificity of the developing brain supports this process. My approach primarily involves using the face processing system as a model domain. Faces are dynamic stimuli from which we extract many different kinds of information (e.g., gender, age, emotional state, mate potential, social status, trustworthiness, intentions, “person knowledge”). All of these processes must be executed accurately and rapidly for many faces over the course of a single day, making face processing among the most taxing perceptual challenges confronted by people in their day-to-day life. Given that faces are also the pre-eminent social signal, studying developmental changes in the behavioral and brain basis of face processing in typically developing individuals and in those affected by social-emotional disorders may index a core set of developmental changes within the broader social information processing system. I employ converging methodologies, including functional (fMRI) and structural magnetic resonance, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) along with detailed behavioral paradigms in both typically developing populations and those with developmental disorders to examine development from early childhood to adulthood.
Most Relevant Publications (4+)

80 total publications

Investigating the Influence of Biological Sex on the Behavioral and Neural Basis of Face Recognition

eneuro / Mar 01, 2017

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Development of Working Memory Maintenance

Journal of Neurophysiology / Jan 01, 2009

Geier, C. F., Garver, K., Terwilliger, R., & Luna, B. (2009). Development of Working Memory Maintenance. Journal of Neurophysiology, 101(1), 84–99. https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.90562.2008

Neural mechanisms of face perception, their emergence over development, and their breakdown

WIREs Cognitive Science / May 19, 2016

Behrmann, M., Scherf, K. S., & Avidan, G. (2016). Neural mechanisms of face perception, their emergence over development, and their breakdown. WIREs Cognitive Science, 7(4), 247–263. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/wcs.1388

Missing the big picture: impaired development of global shape processing in autism

Autism Research / Jan 01, 2008

Suzanne Scherf, K., Luna, B., Kimchi, R., Minshew, N., & Behrmann, M. (2008). Missing the big picture: impaired development of global shape processing in autism. Autism Research, 1(2), 114–129. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.17

Aminda J. O'Hare

Director of Neuroscience and Associate Professor of Psychological Science at Weber State University
Most Relevant Research Interests
General Neuroscience
Other Research Interests (17)
Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Cognition-Emotion Interactions
Anxiety
Mindfulness
Psychiatry and Mental health
And 12 more
About
Dr. Aminda O’Hare is the Director of Neuroscience and an associate professor of Psychological Science at Weber State University in Ogden, UT. She specializes in teaching topics in affective and cognitive neuroscience both in the classroom and in her research lab. The CAPES Lab (Cognitive and Affective Psychophysiology and Experimental Science Lab) is particularly interested in how training in mindfulness practices alters emotion-cognition interactions in the brain. Aminda is an advocate for incorporating practices of wellbeing and healthy habits of mind into higher education for all participants in campus communities (i.e., students, staff, faculty). Aminda loves the outdoors, being in the mountains, spending time with her husband, and being with her dogs and cats.
Most Relevant Publications (5+)

25 total publications

Activation of the posterior cingulate by semantic priming: A co-registered ERP/fMRI study

Brain Research / Jan 01, 2008

O’Hare, A. J., Dien, J., Waterson, L. D., & Savage, C. R. (2008). Activation of the posterior cingulate by semantic priming: A co-registered ERP/fMRI study. Brain Research, 1189, 97–114. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2007.10.095

Increased neural sensitivity to self‐relevant stimuli in major depressive disorder

Psychophysiology / Feb 22, 2019

Benau, E. M., Hill, K. E., Atchley, R. A., O’Hare, A. J., Gibson, L. J., Hajcak, G., Ilardi, S. S., & Foti, D. (2019). Increased neural sensitivity to self‐relevant stimuli in major depressive disorder. Psychophysiology, 56(7). Portico. https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.13345

Evidence for automatic sentence priming in the fusiform semantic area: Convergent ERP and fMRI findings

Brain Research / Dec 01, 2008

Dien, J., & O’Hare, A. J. (2008). Evidence for automatic sentence priming in the fusiform semantic area: Convergent ERP and fMRI findings. Brain Research, 1243, 134–145. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2008.09.045

The Fear Survey Schedule as a measure of anxious arousal: Evidence from ERPs

Neuroscience Letters / Aug 01, 2008

O’Hare, A. J., & Dien, J. (2008). The Fear Survey Schedule as a measure of anxious arousal: Evidence from ERPs. Neuroscience Letters, 441(3), 243–247. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2008.06.017

Central and Divided Visual Field Presentation of Emotional Images to Measure Hemispheric Differences in Motivated Attention

Journal of Visualized Experiments / Nov 16, 2017

O’Hare, A. J., Atchley, R. A., & Young, K. M. (2017). Central and Divided Visual Field Presentation of Emotional Images to Measure Hemispheric Differences in Motivated Attention. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 129. https://doi.org/10.3791/56257-v

Example general neuroscience projects

How can companies collaborate more effectively with researchers, experts, and thought leaders to make progress on general neuroscience?

Consumer Behavior Analysis

An academic researcher in General Neuroscience can analyze consumer behavior by studying neural responses to marketing stimuli. This can help companies understand how their target audience perceives and responds to advertisements, product packaging, and brand messaging. The insights gained from such studies can inform marketing strategies and lead to more effective campaigns.

Product Development

Collaborating with a General Neuroscience researcher can aid in product development by incorporating neuroscientific principles. By understanding how the brain processes sensory information, companies can design products that optimize user experiences and evoke desired emotional responses. This can lead to the creation of products that are more appealing, engaging, and memorable.

Neuroimaging Studies

Academic researchers in General Neuroscience can conduct neuroimaging studies to investigate brain activity associated with specific tasks or experiences. This can be valuable for companies in fields such as advertising, gaming, and user interface design. Neuroimaging data can provide insights into user engagement, attention, and emotional responses, allowing companies to refine their products and tailor them to the needs and preferences of their target audience.

Optimizing User Experiences

General Neuroscience researchers can help companies optimize user experiences by applying principles of cognitive neuroscience. By understanding how the brain processes information, attention, and memory, researchers can provide recommendations for improving the usability, efficiency, and overall satisfaction of digital interfaces, websites, and mobile applications.

Evaluating Interventions

Companies developing interventions or therapies can benefit from collaborating with General Neuroscience researchers. These researchers can design and conduct experiments to evaluate the efficacy of interventions, such as cognitive training programs or neurofeedback-based therapies. By measuring neural changes and behavioral outcomes, companies can refine their interventions and ensure they are evidence-based and effective.