Work with thought leaders and academic experts in urban studies

Companies can benefit from working with an expert in Urban Studies in several ways. Firstly, they can gain valuable insights into urban planning and development, helping them make informed decisions about infrastructure projects. Secondly, experts in Urban Studies can provide expertise in sustainable development, helping companies create environmentally-friendly and socially-responsible initiatives. Additionally, companies can benefit from the expertise of Urban Studies researchers in community engagement, ensuring that their projects are inclusive and meet the needs of local residents. Overall, collaborating with an academic researcher in Urban Studies can lead to innovative solutions, improved urban environments, and positive social impact.

Experts on NotedSource with backgrounds in urban studies include Elizabeth Groff, Roger Sparks, Konstantinos Tsavdaridis, Kathleen Gerson, Emily Owens, Amber Bartosh, Patrick Sharkey, Nam Vu, Grace Lees-Maffei, Hendrik Wolff, Marian Rizov, Jordan Brasher, and William Gartner.

Roger Sparks

Professor of Economics, Mills College at Northeastern University
Most Relevant Research Interests
Urban Studies
Other Research Interests (16)
applied microeconomics
strategy
environment
finance
Pharmacology (medical)
And 11 more
About
Roger Sparks is a Professor of Economics at Mills College, Oakland, CA. He earned his PhD in Economics from the University of California, Davis and has been at Mills College since 1989. Professor Sparks is currently director of the Master of Applied Economics program at Mills and chair of the Economics Department. He has more than 20 research papers published in economics journals, has refereed many paper submissions to professional journals, and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Kemper Human Rights Education Foundation. Professor Sparks’ research applies game theory and the economics of information to a variety of topics, including the theory of unemployment, efficiency wages, employee stock offerings, cyclical changes in labor productivity, the determination of mortgage rates, mortgage securitization, environmental policy, utility regulation, psychiatric decision-making, the energy paradox, and the price impacts of low-carbon fuel standards. This research agenda has allowed him to incorporate into his teaching first-hand knowledge about a variety of topics and techniques of analysis, which in turn has enhanced his students’ curiosity and learning.
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

20 total publications

Putting the squeeze on a market for lemons: Government-sponsored mortgage securitization

The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics / Jun 01, 1996

Passmore, W., & Sparks, R. (1996). Putting the squeeze on a market for lemons: Government-sponsored mortgage securitization. The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, 13(1). https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00174549

Emily Owens

Professor, Department of Criminology, Law and Society
Most Relevant Research Interests
Urban Studies
Other Research Interests (41)
Economics and Econometrics
Finance
Law
Public Administration
Sociology and Political Science
And 36 more
About
Emily Owens is an economist and professor at the University of California, Irvine. She earned her PhD in Economics from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2007, and her MA in Economics from the university in 2005. She holds a BS in Applied Math and Economics from Brown University, which she obtained in 2002. At UC Irvine, Emily is a professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society as well as the Department of Economics. She is an expert in the fields of public policy, urban economics, and law and economics. She has also conducted research on topics such as the effects of increased policing on crime and the impact of school vouchers on educational outcomes. She has published articles in academic journals such as the Journal of Urban Economics and the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

69 total publications

Low-income housing development and crime

Journal of Urban Economics / Sep 01, 2011

Freedman, M., & Owens, E. G. (2011). Low-income housing development and crime. Journal of Urban Economics, 70(2–3), 115–131. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jue.2011.04.001

Does federal financial aid affect college enrollment? Evidence from drug offenders and the Higher Education Act of 1998

Journal of Urban Economics / May 01, 2014

Lovenheim, M. F., & Owens, E. G. (2014). Does federal financial aid affect college enrollment? Evidence from drug offenders and the Higher Education Act of 1998. Journal of Urban Economics, 81, 1–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jue.2014.01.005

Amber Bartosh

Amber Bartosh is a LEED-accredited architect and interior designer. Her work focuses on advanced visualization technologies and hybrid reality (VR) simulations.
Most Relevant Research Interests
Urban Studies
Other Research Interests (6)
Energy (miscellaneous)
Building and Construction
Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
Computer Science Applications
Visual Arts and Performing Arts
And 1 more
About
Architecture, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Hybrid Reality, Sustainability, Resilience
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

6 total publications

Mixed Reality Visualizations of Urban Data

Technology|Architecture + Design / Jan 02, 2019

Bartosh, A., & Clark, L. (2019). Mixed Reality Visualizations of Urban Data. Technology|Architecture + Design, 3(1), 89–101. https://doi.org/10.1080/24751448.2019.1571832

Virtual Environment for Design and Analysis (VEDA): Interactive and Immersive Energy Data Visualizations for Architectural Design

Technology|Architecture + Design / May 01, 2017

Bartosh, A., & Krietemeyer, B. (2017). Virtual Environment for Design and Analysis (VEDA): Interactive and Immersive Energy Data Visualizations for Architectural Design. Technology|Architecture + Design, 1(1), 50–60. https://doi.org/10.1080/24751448.2017.1292794

Patrick Sharkey

William S Tod Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Princeton University
Most Relevant Research Interests
Urban Studies
Other Research Interests (22)
Sociology and Political Science
Demography
Multidisciplinary
Law
Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
And 17 more
About
Patrick Sharkey is a professor of sociology at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University in 2007. His research focuses on issues of urban poverty and inequality, racial stratification, and violence. As a journalist he has written extensively on inequity and the roots of racial disparities in the American city. He is the recipient of numerous academic awards, including the National Science Foundation's CAREER Award, the J.S. Guggenheim Fellowship, and the William Julius Wilson Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Urban and Inequality. His first book, Stuck in Place: Urban Neighborhoods and the End of Progress Toward Racial Equality, won the Robert E. Park Book Award for the best book in urban sociology. He has also served as an advisor to policymakers, foundation leaders, and community organizers across the United States.
Most Relevant Publications (4+)

73 total publications

The effect of violent crime on economic mobility

Journal of Urban Economics / Nov 01, 2017

Sharkey, P., & Torrats-Espinosa, G. (2017). The effect of violent crime on economic mobility. Journal of Urban Economics, 102, 22–33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jue.2017.07.001

The long-run effects of the 1930s HOLC “redlining” maps on place-based measures of economic opportunity and socioeconomic success

Regional Science and Urban Economics / Jan 01, 2021

Aaronson, D., Faber, J., Hartley, D., Mazumder, B., & Sharkey, P. (2021). The long-run effects of the 1930s HOLC “redlining” maps on place-based measures of economic opportunity and socioeconomic success. Regional Science and Urban Economics, 86, 103622. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2020.103622

Disentangling the Effects of Race and Place in Economic Transactions: Findings from an Online Field Experiment

City & Community / Jun 01, 2019

Besbris, M., Faber, J. W., & Sharkey, P. (2019). Disentangling the Effects of Race and Place in Economic Transactions: Findings from an Online Field Experiment. City & Community, 18(2), 529–555. https://doi.org/10.1111/cico.12394

The academic effects of chronic exposure to neighbourhood violence

Urban Studies / Oct 23, 2021

Schwartz, A. E., Laurito, A., Lacoe, J., Sharkey, P., & Ellen, I. G. (2021). The academic effects of chronic exposure to neighbourhood violence. Urban Studies, 59(14), 3005–3021. https://doi.org/10.1177/00420980211052149

Hendrik Wolff

Professor, London School of Economics
Most Relevant Research Interests
Urban Studies
Other Research Interests (22)
Economics and Econometrics
Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
Nature and Landscape Conservation
General Environmental Science
And 17 more
About
Hendrik Wolff is Professor of Environmental Economics at The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). * Hendrik's main research is in environmental economics, working at the intersection of transportation, air pollution, energy and health. This includes the economic causes and consequences of air pollution; the ”value of time;” the impact of energy conservation policies on electricity consumption; cost benefit analysis of the clean air act and its effects on health; the interactions between climate, local prices, wages and “quality of life; and the economics of Daylight Saving Time. He also developed new econometric estimators for large supply and demand systems that are used in agriculture and energy. He has conducted research projects in Ecuador, Germany, Mexico, Australia, Bangladesh, Ghana, England, Chile and the United States. Hendrik is a Faculty Affiliate of the UW Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, an IZA Research Fellow, and a CESIfo Research Network Affiliate. He was a visiting professor at Resources for the Future, as well as at LMU Munich, University of Cologne and at IZA, Bonn. * Hendrik’s work has impact on both academia and policy. He won the 2009 Ralph C d’Arge and Allen V. Kneese Award for Outstanding Publication, which is awarded annually for the Best Paper in Environmental and Resource Economics. His research has led to important policy changes by the United Nations and the World Bank on the measurement of indices (the Human Development Index (HDI) and the Ease of Doing Business Index). His work is discussed on television (e.g., ABC News) and international media (e.g., The Economist, The Wall Street Journal). He has successfully obtained external funding from organizations such as the NSF, as well as CSSS and the Royalty Research Fund. In addition, he has been the chair for PhD students and Honors students, many of whom have won multiple awards. The job placements of Hendrik’s students are detailed in his CV. He has also consulted for the U.S. Department of Energy and for the President of the World Bank on important policy issues related to his research. * Hendrik is the director of [SelfDrivingCities.com](https://www.selfdrivingcities.com/) a research lab that connects academic researchers, government, and industry in the urban mobility space
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

37 total publications

Effectiveness of payment for ecosystem services after loss and uncertainty of compensation

Nature Sustainability / Nov 22, 2021

Hayes, T., Murtinho, F., Wolff, H., López-Sandoval, M. F., & Salazar, J. (2021). Effectiveness of payment for ecosystem services after loss and uncertainty of compensation. Nature Sustainability, 5(1), 81–88. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-021-00804-5

Marian Rizov

Professor of Business Economics
Most Relevant Research Interests
Urban Studies
Other Research Interests (42)
Microeconomics
Labour
IO
Agriculture
Development
And 37 more
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

84 total publications

Is there a limit to agglomeration? Evidence from productivity of Dutch firms

Regional Science and Urban Economics / Jul 01, 2012

Rizov, M., Oskam, A., & Walsh, P. (2012). Is there a limit to agglomeration? Evidence from productivity of Dutch firms. Regional Science and Urban Economics, 42(4), 595–606. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2012.02.006

Example urban studies projects

How can companies collaborate more effectively with researchers, experts, and thought leaders to make progress on urban studies?

Urban Redevelopment Project

An Urban Studies expert can provide insights into the revitalization of urban areas, helping companies transform underutilized spaces into vibrant and economically thriving communities. They can analyze the social, economic, and environmental factors that contribute to successful urban redevelopment projects and provide recommendations for sustainable and inclusive development.

Transportation Planning

Companies can collaborate with Urban Studies researchers to develop efficient and sustainable transportation systems. Experts in Urban Studies can analyze traffic patterns, public transportation infrastructure, and urban design to optimize transportation networks and reduce congestion. This collaboration can lead to improved mobility, reduced carbon emissions, and enhanced quality of life for residents.

Affordable Housing Initiative

An academic researcher in Urban Studies can assist companies in developing affordable housing initiatives. They can analyze housing markets, assess the needs of low-income communities, and propose strategies for increasing affordable housing stock. This collaboration can help companies address the housing affordability crisis and contribute to the creation of inclusive and equitable communities.

Urban Sustainability Assessment

Companies can benefit from working with Urban Studies experts to assess the sustainability of their operations and develop strategies for reducing their environmental impact. Researchers in Urban Studies can conduct comprehensive sustainability audits, identify areas for improvement, and provide recommendations for implementing sustainable practices. This collaboration can enhance companies' corporate social responsibility efforts and contribute to a more sustainable future.

Community Development Program

Collaborating with an academic researcher in Urban Studies can help companies design and implement community development programs. Experts in Urban Studies can conduct needs assessments, engage with local stakeholders, and develop strategies for empowering communities. This collaboration can lead to the creation of thriving and resilient neighborhoods, fostering social cohesion and economic growth.