Work with thought leaders and academic experts in biomaterials

Companies can greatly benefit from collaborating with Biomaterials experts. These researchers bring a deep understanding of the field and can provide valuable insights and expertise. Here are some ways companies can collaborate with Biomaterials researchers: 1. Research and Development: Biomaterials experts can contribute to the development of new materials and technologies, helping companies stay at the forefront of innovation. 2. Product Design and Improvement: Collaborating with Biomaterials researchers can lead to the design and improvement of products with enhanced performance, durability, and biocompatibility. 3. Testing and Evaluation: Biomaterials experts can conduct rigorous testing and evaluation of materials and products, ensuring their safety and efficacy. 4. Regulatory Compliance: Collaborating with Biomaterials researchers can help companies navigate complex regulatory requirements and ensure compliance with industry standards. 5. Technology Transfer: Biomaterials researchers often have access to cutting-edge technology and can facilitate technology transfer to companies, enabling them to leverage advanced tools and techniques. 6. Problem Solving: Biomaterials experts can help companies solve complex challenges related to material selection, biocompatibility, and tissue engineering. 7. Intellectual Property: Collaborating with Biomaterials researchers can lead to the development of intellectual property, such as patents and proprietary technologies, which can provide a competitive advantage. 8. Education and Training: Biomaterials researchers can provide education and training to company employees, enhancing their knowledge and skills in the field. By collaborating with Biomaterials experts, companies can gain a competitive edge, accelerate their research and development efforts, and deliver innovative products to the market.

Researchers on NotedSource with backgrounds in biomaterials include Daniel Milej, Ph.D., Mohammad Imran Khan, Aruna Ranaweera, Dr. Fantai Kong, Ph.D., Tim Osswald, Katie Barr, and Michael Hickner.

Daniel Milej, Ph.D.

London, Ontario, Canada
Ph.D. in biomedical engineering
Most Relevant Research Interests
Biomaterials
Other Research Interests (31)
Biomedical Optics
NIRS
fNIRS
Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy
CBF
And 26 more
About
Dr. Daniel Milej is a multidisciplinary researcher with experience in medical biophysics, electronics, biocybernetics, biomedical optics and engineering. He is highly knowledgeable and experienced in a range of research techniques. He is currently a Research Associate at the Lawson Health Research Institute, leading the transition of multimodal optical imaging systems from a research setting to clinical use in an ICU and OR environment, working closely with teams of nurses, surgeons, doctors and respiratory therapists. Previously he was a postdoctoral fellow working on developing noninvasive modalities for brain activity monitoring in the Department of Medical Biophysics at Western University. Before that, Dr. Milej worked as a researcher at the Nalecz Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering. He obtained his Ph.D. in 2014 from the Polish Academy of Science, specializing in Electronics and Biomedical Engineering. He received his MSc from the Military University of Technology in 2008.
Most Relevant Publications (7+)

91 total publications

Performance assessment of time-domain optical brain imagers, part 1: basic instrumental performance protocol

Journal of Biomedical Optics / Aug 14, 2014

Wabnitz, H., Taubert, D. R., Mazurenka, M., Steinkellner, O., Jelzow, A., Macdonald, R., Milej, D., Sawosz, P., Kacprzak, M., Liebert, A., Cooper, R., Hebden, J., Pifferi, A., Farina, A., Bargigia, I., Contini, D., Caffini, M., Zucchelli, L., Spinelli, L., … Torricelli, A. (2014). Performance assessment of time-domain optical brain imagers, part 1: basic instrumental performance protocol. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 19(8), 086010. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.jbo.19.8.086010

Performance assessment of time-domain optical brain imagers, part 2: nEUROPt protocol

Journal of Biomedical Optics / Aug 14, 2014

Wabnitz, H., Jelzow, A., Mazurenka, M., Steinkellner, O., Macdonald, R., Milej, D., Zolek, N., Kacprzak, M., Sawosz, P., Maniewski, R., Liebert, A., Magazov, S., Hebden, J., Martelli, F., Di Ninni, P., Zaccanti, G., Torricelli, A., Contini, D., Re, R., … Pifferi, A. (2014). Performance assessment of time-domain optical brain imagers, part 2: nEUROPt protocol. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 19(8), 086012. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.jbo.19.8.086012

Wavelength-resolved measurements of fluorescence lifetime of indocyanine green

Journal of Biomedical Optics / Jan 01, 2011

Gerega, A., Zolek, N., Soltysinski, T., Milej, D., Sawosz, P., Toczylowska, B., & Liebert, A. (2011). Wavelength-resolved measurements of fluorescence lifetime of indocyanine green. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 16(6), 067010. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.3593386

Assessment of inflow and washout of indocyanine green in the adult human brain by monitoring of diffuse reflectance at large source-detector separation

Journal of Biomedical Optics / Jan 01, 2011

Liebert, A., Sawosz, P., Milej, D., Kacprzak, M., Weigl, W., Botwicz, M., Mączewska, J., Fronczewska, K., Mayzner-Zawadzka, E., Królicki, L., & Maniewski, R. (2011). Assessment of inflow and washout of indocyanine green in the adult human brain by monitoring of diffuse reflectance at large source-detector separation. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 16(4), 046011. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.3574018

Optimization of the method for assessment of brain perfusion in humans using contrast-enhanced reflectometry: multidistance time-resolved measurements

Journal of Biomedical Optics / Oct 28, 2015

Milej, D., Janusek, D., Gerega, A., Wojtkiewicz, S., Sawosz, P., Treszczanowicz, J., Weigl, W., & Liebert, A. (2015). Optimization of the method for assessment of brain perfusion in humans using contrast-enhanced reflectometry: multidistance time-resolved measurements. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 20(10), 106013. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.jbo.20.10.106013

Multiwavelength time-resolved detection of fluorescence during the inflow of indocyanine green into the adult’s brain

Journal of Biomedical Optics / Aug 02, 2012

Gerega, A. (2012). Multiwavelength time-resolved detection of fluorescence during the inflow of indocyanine green into the adult’s brain. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 17(8), 087001. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.jbo.17.8.087001

Incorporating early and late-arriving photons to improve the reconstruction of cerebral hemodynamic responses acquired by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

Journal of Biomedical Optics / May 17, 2021

Milej, D., Abdalmalak, A., Rajaram, A., Jhajj, A., Owen, A. M., & St. Lawrence, K. (2021). Incorporating early and late-arriving photons to improve the reconstruction of cerebral hemodynamic responses acquired by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy. Journal of Biomedical Optics, 26(05). https://doi.org/10.1117/1.jbo.26.5.056003

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Tim Osswald

Polymers Professor - University of Wisconsin
Most Relevant Research Interests
Biomaterials
Other Research Interests (44)
Polymer Engineering
Advanced Manufacturing
Composites
Additive Manufacturing
Materials Chemistry
And 39 more
About
T. Osswald is Hoeganaes Professor of Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he has been a faculty member since 1989. Osswald received the PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1987, the MS in Mechanical Engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 1982, and the BS in Mechanical Engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 1981. Before joining the UW-Madison faculty, Osswald was a Humboldt Fellow at the Rheinisch Westfalische Technische Hochschule Aachen. Osswald’s research interests are in the areas of processing-structure-property relationships for metals and composites, with a focus on powder metallurgy and metal injection molding. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the US Army Research Office, and industry. Osswald is a Fellow of ASM International and the American Academy of Mechanics, and he has received the Extrusion Division Award, the Powder Metallurgy Division Award, and the Distinguished Teaching Award from TMS.
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

117 total publications

Incorporation of Mg particles into PDLLA regulates mesenchymal stem cell and macrophage responses

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A / Dec 29, 2015

Cifuentes, S. C., Bensiamar, F., Gallardo-Moreno, A. M., Osswald, T. A., González-Carrasco, J. L., Benavente, R., González-Martín, M. L., García-Rey, E., Vilaboa, N., & Saldaña, L. (2015). Incorporation of Mg particles into PDLLA regulates mesenchymal stem cell and macrophage responses. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 104(4), 866–878. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.35625

Micro-injection molded, poly(vinyl alcohol)-calcium salt templates for precise customization of 3D hydrogel internal architecture

Acta Biomaterialia / Sep 01, 2019

McNulty, J. D., Marti-Figueroa, C., Seipel, F., Plantz, J. Z., Ellingham, T., Duddleston, L. J. L., Goris, S., Cox, B. L., Osswald, T. A., Turng, L.-S., & Ashton, R. S. (2019). Micro-injection molded, poly(vinyl alcohol)-calcium salt templates for precise customization of 3D hydrogel internal architecture. Acta Biomaterialia, 95, 258–268. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2019.04.050

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Katie Barr

Warrington
Bioinformatician and developer with strong academic and commercial experience
Most Relevant Research Interests
Biomaterials
Other Research Interests (11)
Computer Science Applications
Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
Bioengineering
Pharmacology (medical)
Biochemistry (medical)
And 6 more
About
Katie Barr is a bioinformatician with a strong background in computer science. She received her Ph.D in Quantum Information from the University of Leeds in 2013. She also holds an MSc in Mathematical logic and the theory of computation from the University of Manchester, and a BSc in Physics and Philosophy with study in Continental Europe from the University of Bristol. Katie has extensive experience working in the fields of bioinformatics and software development. She has worked as a scientific programmer at the Earlham Institute, a postdoctoral bioinformatician in the Nanomedicine group at the University of Manchester, and is now an Associate Principal Scientist in Bioinformatics at Kromek. Katie is passionate about using her knowledge and skills to improve the lives of others and she is dedicated to the advancement of science and technology. She believes in the power of collaboration and works to create meaningful partnerships between industry and academia.
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

9 total publications

Graphene Oxide Nanoscale Platform Enhances the Anti‐Cancer Properties of Bortezomib in Glioblastoma Models

Advanced Healthcare Materials / Nov 11, 2022

Sharp, P. S., Stylianou, M., Arellano, L. M., Neves, J. C., Gravagnuolo, A. M., Dodd, A., Barr, K., Lozano, N., Kisby, T., & Kostarelos, K. (2022). Graphene Oxide Nanoscale Platform Enhances the Anti‐Cancer Properties of Bortezomib in Glioblastoma Models. Advanced Healthcare Materials, 12(3). Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.202201968

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Michael Hickner

Michigan State University
Most Relevant Research Interests
Biomaterials
Other Research Interests (35)
polymers : 3D printing : materials chemistry : energy : water
Colloid and Surface Chemistry
Biochemistry
Catalysis
Pollution
And 30 more
About
Michael Hickner is an accomplished researcher and educator with an extensive background in chemical engineering. He received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Virginia Tech in 2003. For the past 15 years, Hickner has been a Rogerson Endowed Professor at Michigan State University, where he has conducted highly acclaimed research in the areas of sustainable energy technologies and nanomanufacturing. Previous to this appointment, Hickner was a Senior Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories, where he conducted post-doctoral research in the fields of materials science, nanotechnology, and catalysis. Given his diverse skill set and supportive leadership style, Michigan State students look to Hickner to provide them with the guidance, mentorship, and educational tools necessary to excel in the field of chemical engineering.
Most Relevant Publications (4+)

217 total publications

High Performance Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Enabled by Fluoropoly(olefin) Membranes

Advanced Functional Materials / May 20, 2019

Zhu, L., Peng, X., Shang, S., Kwasny, M. T., Zimudzi, T. J., Yu, X., Saikia, N., Pan, J., Liu, Z., Tew, G. N., Mustain, W. E., Yandrasits, M., & Hickner, M. A. (2019). High Performance Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Enabled by Fluoropoly(olefin) Membranes. Advanced Functional Materials, 29(26), 1902059. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201902059

Ceramic–Salt Composite Electrolytes from Cold Sintering

Advanced Functional Materials / Apr 01, 2019

Lee, W., Lyon, C. K., Seo, J., Lopez‐Hallman, R., Leng, Y., Wang, C., Hickner, M. A., Randall, C. A., & Gomez, E. D. (2019). Ceramic–Salt Composite Electrolytes from Cold Sintering. Advanced Functional Materials, 29(20), 1807872. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201807872

Substrate‐Dependent Molecular and Nanostructural Orientation of Nafion Thin Films

Advanced Functional Materials / Jul 11, 2019

Kushner, D. I., Kusoglu, A., Podraza, N. J., & Hickner, M. A. (2019). Substrate‐Dependent Molecular and Nanostructural Orientation of Nafion Thin Films. Advanced Functional Materials, 29(37), 1902699. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201902699

Impact of Substrate and Processing on Confinement of Nafion Thin Films

Advanced Functional Materials / Apr 24, 2014

Kusoglu, A., Kushner, D., Paul, D. K., Karan, K., Hickner, M. A., & Weber, A. Z. (2014). Impact of Substrate and Processing on Confinement of Nafion Thin Films. Advanced Functional Materials, 24(30), 4763–4774. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201304311

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Example biomaterials projects

How can companies collaborate more effectively with researchers, experts, and thought leaders to make progress on biomaterials?

Development of Biodegradable Implants

A company in the medical device industry can collaborate with a Biomaterials expert to develop biodegradable implants for orthopedic applications. These implants would provide temporary support during the healing process and gradually degrade, eliminating the need for additional surgeries.

Bioactive Coatings for Dental Implants

A dental implant manufacturer can work with a Biomaterials researcher to develop bioactive coatings for dental implants. These coatings would promote osseointegration, improving the success rate and longevity of dental implants.

Drug Delivery Systems

A pharmaceutical company can collaborate with a Biomaterials expert to design and develop drug delivery systems. These systems can improve the targeted delivery of drugs, enhance their efficacy, and reduce side effects.

Tissue Engineering for Organ Regeneration

A biotechnology company can partner with a Biomaterials researcher to advance tissue engineering techniques for organ regeneration. This collaboration can lead to the development of functional and biocompatible organs for transplantation.

Biomaterials for 3D Printing

A manufacturing company can work with a Biomaterials expert to develop biomaterials suitable for 3D printing. These materials can be used to create complex structures with precise dimensions, opening up new possibilities in various industries.