Work with thought leaders and academic experts in biological psychiatry

Companies can greatly benefit from working with experts in the field of Biological Psychiatry. These researchers bring a deep understanding of the biological and psychological factors influencing mental health. By collaborating with them, companies can enhance their research and development efforts, gain insights into the latest advancements in psychiatric treatments, and develop innovative solutions for mental health disorders. Additionally, these experts can provide valuable guidance in clinical trials, help in the development of new drugs, and contribute to the design of evidence-based interventions. Their expertise can also be leveraged in the development of digital health technologies, such as mobile apps and wearable devices, to monitor and manage mental health conditions. Overall, partnering with academic researchers in Biological Psychiatry can lead to improved mental health outcomes and contribute to the advancement of psychiatric knowledge.

Researchers on NotedSource with backgrounds in biological psychiatry include Dr. Katherine Thompson, Ph.D., Savannah Lokey, Ph.D., Daniel Milej, Ph.D., Sonja Lyubomirsky, Laura Schulze, Nora S Vyas, Ph.D., Roshonda Jones, Sheila Monfared, Ph.D., Norman Farb, and K. Suzanne Scherf.

Savannah Lokey, Ph.D.

Los Angeles, California, United States of America
Research specialist in social neuroscience and clinical psychology | Clinical expert in evidence-based therapy for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (14)
Schizophrenia
fMRI
Social Cognition
Neuropsychology
Behavioral Neuroscience
And 9 more
About
Dr. Savannah Lokey is a clinician-scientist with a passion for research and helping others. She received her Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Arizona State University in 2015, followed by a Master of Arts in Psychology in 2017 and Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology in 2023 from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Lokey has gained valuable experience in the field of clinical psychology and social neuroscience through various positions. She served as an Intramural Research Training Fellow (IRTA) at the National Institute of Mental Health, where she conducted research on how a rare genetic disorder (Moebius Syndrome) affects emotion processing and underlying neurocircuitry. She also worked as a Research Associate at Rush University Medical Center, where she focused on the social neuroscience of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. She uses many techniques in her research, including fMRI, ecological momentary assessment (EMA), survey research, and passive smartphone sensor data. In addition to her research experience, Dr. Lokey has also received clinical training in various settings. She completed a predoctoral internship in the Major Mental Illness track at the University of California Los Angeles, where she provided psychotherapy and assessment services to individuals with severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, etc.). She has deep knowledge about evidence-based interventions and principles of behavioral change, including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (CBT), trauma therapy, exposure therapy, cognitive remediation, and social skills training. Dr. Lokey is dedicated to using her knowledge and skills to improve the lives of individuals struggling with mental health issues. She is committed to expanding research on these conditions and developing and testing new treatment approaches in the field of psychology. In her free time, she enjoys hiking, reading, and spending time with her family and friends.
Most Relevant Publications (5+)

12 total publications

F158. Changes in Emotion Processing Network Following Social Cognitive Training in Individuals With Schizophrenia

Biological Psychiatry / May 01, 2019

Haut, K., Galindo, B., Lee, A., Lokey, S., Nahum, M., & Hooker, C. (2019). F158. Changes in Emotion Processing Network Following Social Cognitive Training in Individuals With Schizophrenia. Biological Psychiatry, 85(10), S274. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.03.695

Individuals with Schizophrenia Under-Recruit Social Brain Regions During a Theory of Mind Task

Biological Psychiatry / May 01, 2021

Lokey, S., Haut, K. M., Lee, A., Galindo, B., Pridgen, S., Saxena, A., Nahum, M., & Hooker, C. I. (2021). Individuals with Schizophrenia Under-Recruit Social Brain Regions During a Theory of Mind Task. Biological Psychiatry, 89(9), S173–S174. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.02.443

Altered Connectivity in Neural Networks Underlying Social Cognition in Individuals at Risk For Psychosis

Biological Psychiatry / May 01, 2020

Haut, K., Lee, A., Galindo, B., Lokey, S., Nahum, M., & Hooker, C. I. (2020). Altered Connectivity in Neural Networks Underlying Social Cognition in Individuals at Risk For Psychosis. Biological Psychiatry, 87(9), S250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2020.02.646

P503. Improved Cognition following Targeted Cognitive Training in Individuals With Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

Biological Psychiatry / May 01, 2022

Haut, K., Flynn, R., Galindo, B., Wronski, M., Lokey, S., Nahum, M., Seidman, L., & Hooker, C. I. (2022). P503. Improved Cognition following Targeted Cognitive Training in Individuals With Clinical High Risk for Psychosis. Biological Psychiatry, 91(9), S291–S292. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2022.02.740

Improvements in Cognition Following Cognitive Training in Individuals at Risk for Psychosis

Biological Psychiatry / May 01, 2021

Haut, K., Galindo, B., Lee, A., Lokey, S., Nahum, M., & Hooker, C. I. (2021). Improvements in Cognition Following Cognitive Training in Individuals at Risk for Psychosis. Biological Psychiatry, 89(9), S217. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.02.549

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Daniel Milej, Ph.D.

London, Ontario, Canada
Ph.D. in biomedical engineering
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (31)
Biomedical Optics
NIRS
fNIRS
Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy
CBF
And 26 more
About
Dr. Daniel Milej is a multidisciplinary researcher with experience in medical biophysics, electronics, biocybernetics, biomedical optics and engineering. He is highly knowledgeable and experienced in a range of research techniques. He is currently a Research Associate at the Lawson Health Research Institute, leading the transition of multimodal optical imaging systems from a research setting to clinical use in an ICU and OR environment, working closely with teams of nurses, surgeons, doctors and respiratory therapists. Previously he was a postdoctoral fellow working on developing noninvasive modalities for brain activity monitoring in the Department of Medical Biophysics at Western University. Before that, Dr. Milej worked as a researcher at the Nalecz Institute of Biocybernetics and Biomedical Engineering. He obtained his Ph.D. in 2014 from the Polish Academy of Science, specializing in Electronics and Biomedical Engineering. He received his MSc from the Military University of Technology in 2008.
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

91 total publications

The Potential Role of fNIRS in Evaluating Levels of Consciousness

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience / Jul 08, 2021

Abdalmalak, A., Milej, D., Norton, L., Debicki, D. B., Owen, A. M., & Lawrence, K. St. (2021). The Potential Role of fNIRS in Evaluating Levels of Consciousness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 15. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2021.703405

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Sonja Lyubomirsky

Distinguished Professor, University of California, Riverside
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (30)
well-being
History and Philosophy of Science
Sociology and Political Science
Developmental and Educational Psychology
Clinical Psychology
And 25 more
About
Professor Lyubomirsky’s research interests include well-being, happiness, self-regulation, and talents. She is widely published, with well over 100 articles and chapters and four books, The How of Happiness (Penguin, 2007), The Myths of Happiness (Penguin, 2013), The How of Happiness Workbook (Penguin, 2008), and Designing Your Life (Avery, 2016). Professor Lyubomirsky has received numerous awards for her work, including the American Psychological Association’s Positive Psychology Prize (2015), the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award (2009), and a Guggenheim Fellowship (2008-2009). She is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the American Psychological Association.
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

114 total publications

Positive activities as protective factors against mental health conditions.

Journal of Abnormal Psychology / Feb 01, 2014

Layous, K., Chancellor, J., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2014). Positive activities as protective factors against mental health conditions. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 123(1), 3–12. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0034709

Kindness in the blood: A randomized controlled trial of the gene regulatory impact of prosocial behavior

Psychoneuroendocrinology / Jul 01, 2017

Nelson-Coffey, S. K., Fritz, M. M., Lyubomirsky, S., & Cole, S. W. (2017). Kindness in the blood: A randomized controlled trial of the gene regulatory impact of prosocial behavior. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 81, 8–13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.03.025

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Laura Schulze

TORONTO, Ontario, Canada
Passionate mental health researcher with a PhD in Neuroscience, dedicated to fostering innovation and empathy in accessible and holistic mental health care.
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (2)
Psychiatry and Mental health
Pharmacology
About
Hi! My name is Laura, and I am a mental health researcher and neuroscientist from Toronto. I have a diverse background in clinical research, industry/startup involvement, and advisory roles. My passion lies in exploring the potential of neurotech and utilizing data-driven insights to understand and support mental well-being. I also deeply value the role of community and collective well-being in fostering positive mental health outcomes.
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

8 total publications

Cognitive safety of dorsomedial prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in major depression

European Neuropsychopharmacology / Jul 01, 2016

Schulze, L., Wheeler, S., McAndrews, M. P., Solomon, C. J. E., Giacobbe, P., & Downar, J. (2016). Cognitive safety of dorsomedial prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in major depression. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 26(7), 1213–1226. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2016.04.004

Antipsychotic response in first-episode schizophrenia: efficacy of high doses and switching

European Neuropsychopharmacology / Sep 01, 2013

Agid, O., Schulze, L., Arenovich, T., Sajeev, G., McDonald, K., Foussias, G., Fervaha, G., & Remington, G. (2013). Antipsychotic response in first-episode schizophrenia: efficacy of high doses and switching. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(9), 1017–1022. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2013.04.010

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Nora S Vyas, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Mental Health, with interest in civic engagement and partnerships
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (24)
Psychosis
neuroimaging
neuropsychology
mindfulness
neurodevelopmental disorders
And 19 more
About
Dr Nora S Vyas is an Associate Professor in Psychology at the Department of Psychology, Kingston University. She joined Kingston University in 2012, and previously held a Senior Lecturer position at Middlesex University. Dr Vyas completed her PhD in psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), University of London in 2008. Following her PhD, she worked at the Child Psychiatry Branch, National Institutes of Health (Washington DC, USA) as a Lindemann Trust Fellow (English-Speaking Union), preceded by a Fulbright Distinguished Fellowship in 2010. Dr Vyas teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate level in child/adolescent and adult mental health, health psychology, and clinical/cognitive neuroscience. Her research focuses on using clinical, cognitive, and imaging techniques to study individuals with serious mental health problems such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. She applies these skills in other fields such as oncology and mindfulness. Her research specialism is early-onset psychosis, and she has published her work widely.
Most Relevant Publications (8+)

30 total publications

A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study of White Matter in Early-Onset Schizophrenia

Biological Psychiatry / Mar 01, 2008

Kyriakopoulos, M., Vyas, N. S., Barker, G. J., Chitnis, X. A., & Frangou, S. (2008). A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study of White Matter in Early-Onset Schizophrenia. Biological Psychiatry, 63(5), 519–523. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2007.05.021

Neurobiology and phenotypic expression in early onset schizophrenia

Early Intervention in Psychiatry / Jan 27, 2011

Vyas, N. S., Patel, N. H., & Puri, B. K. (2011). Neurobiology and phenotypic expression in early onset schizophrenia. Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 5(1), 3–14. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-7893.2010.00253.x

Deficits in visual sustained attention differentiate genetic liability and disease expression for Schizophrenia from Bipolar Disorder

Schizophrenia Research / Dec 01, 2010

Kumar, C. T. S., Christodoulou, T., Vyas, N. S., Kyriakopoulos, M., Corrigall, R., Reichenberg, A., & Frangou, S. (2010). Deficits in visual sustained attention differentiate genetic liability and disease expression for Schizophrenia from Bipolar Disorder. Schizophrenia Research, 124(1–3), 152–160. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2010.07.006

0509 THE MAUDSLEY EARLY ONSET SCHIZOPHRENIA STUDY: PREDICTORS OF PSYCHOSOCIAL OUTCOME AT A 4-YEAR FOLLOW-UP

Schizophrenia Research / Oct 01, 2006

Vyas, N. S., Vourdas, A., Byrne, P., & Frangou, S. (2006). 0509 THE MAUDSLEY EARLY ONSET SCHIZOPHRENIA STUDY: PREDICTORS OF PSYCHOSOCIAL OUTCOME AT A 4-YEAR FOLLOW-UP. Schizophrenia Research, 86, S159–S160. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0920-9964(06)70480-7

230 – Age of onset modifies location of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia

Schizophrenia Research / Feb 01, 2008

Kyriakopoulos, M., Perez-Iglesias, R., Woolley, J. B., Kanaan, R. A. A., Vyas, N. S., Barker, G. J., Frangou, S., & McGuire, P. K. (2008). 230 – Age of onset modifies location of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 98, 128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2007.12.297

Neurocognitive profile of adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia and their unaffected siblings

The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry / Feb 10, 2022

Vyas, N. S., Burke, L., Netherwood, S., Caviston, P., Simic, M., & Buchsbaum, M. S. (2022). Neurocognitive profile of adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia and their unaffected siblings. The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 23(9), 677–688. https://doi.org/10.1080/15622975.2021.2023758

D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding with [F-18]fallypride correlates of executive function in medication-naïve patients with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia Research / Feb 01, 2018

Vyas, N. S., Buchsbaum, M. S., Lehrer, D. S., Merrill, B. M., DeCastro, A., Doninger, N. A., Christian, B. T., & Mukherjee, J. (2018). D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding with [F-18]fallypride correlates of executive function in medication-naïve patients with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 192, 442–456. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2017.05.017

Association of KIBRA rs17070145 polymorphism with episodic memory in the early stages of a human neurodevelopmental disorder

Psychiatry Research / Dec 01, 2014

Vyas, N. S., Ahn, K., Stahl, D. R., Caviston, P., Simic, M., Netherwood, S., Puri, B. K., Lee, Y., & Aitchison, K. J. (2014). Association of KIBRA rs17070145 polymorphism with episodic memory in the early stages of a human neurodevelopmental disorder. Psychiatry Research, 220(1–2), 37–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.07.024

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Sheila Monfared, Ph.D.

Specialist in Psychology, Human Factors, and Social Engineering: Delivering Impactful Research Solutions in academia and Industry
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (12)
Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Nephrology
Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Applied Psychology
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
And 7 more
About
Sheila Monfared, Ph.D. is a seasoned researcher and consultant with specialized expertise in human factors and sports psychology. Her advanced degrees in Sports Psychology from Florida State University and Human Factors from Georgia Institute of Technology equip her with a unique skill set that bridges the gap between technology and human performance. Sheila's Master of Science in Kinesiology from Tehran University further complements her holistic approach to enhancing performance and mental health. In her professional career, Sheila has excelled in roles such as Strategic Planning Consultant at Saddleback College and Research Scientist at Innisghtful, focusing on research and interface design. Her extensive research experience in cognitive ergonomics and human-computer interaction allows her to provide tailored solutions to individuals and organizations. Sheila's passion lies in using her diverse knowledge to drive success and innovation. Whether optimizing sports performance or enhancing user experience, she is dedicated to helping clients reach their full potential.
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

6 total publications

The effect of category learning on visual attention and visual representation

Psychophysiology / Aug 04, 2017

Folstein, J. R., Monfared, S. S., & Maravel, T. (2017). The effect of category learning on visual attention and visual representation. Psychophysiology, 54(12), 1855–1871. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12966

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Norman Farb

Associate Professor at University of Toronto - Mississauga
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (33)
Mindfulness- Emotion - Affect - Attention - Neuroscience - Interoception
Cognitive Neuroscience
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Psychiatry and Mental health
Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
And 28 more
About
Norman Farb, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, where he directs the Regulatory and Affective Dynamics laboratory (www.radlab.zone). He studies the psychology of well-being, focusing on mental habits, such as how we think about ourselves and interpret our emotions. He is particularly interested in why people differ in their resilience to stress, depression, and anxiety. Prof. Farb's work currently explores online training to support wellbeing, as well as neuroimaging to understand how emotional reactions predict mental health over the lifespan.
Most Relevant Publications (7+)

95 total publications

Mood-Linked Responses in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Predict Relapse in Patients with Recurrent Unipolar Depression

Biological Psychiatry / Aug 01, 2011

Farb, N. A. S., Anderson, A. K., Bloch, R. T., & Segal, Z. V. (2011). Mood-Linked Responses in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Predict Relapse in Patients with Recurrent Unipolar Depression. Biological Psychiatry, 70(4), 366–372. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2011.03.009

First-episode major depression and treatment with escitalopram: an fMRI study

European Neuropsychopharmacology / Oct 01, 2016

Ravindran, A., Harkness, K., Ravindran, L., Jain, T., & Farb, N. (2016). First-episode major depression and treatment with escitalopram: an fMRI study. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 26, S467. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0924-977x(16)31464-x

Static and Treatment-Responsive Brain Biomarkers of Depression Recurrence Following Prophylactic Psychotherapy

Biological Psychiatry / May 01, 2021

Farb, N., Anderson, A., & Segal, Z. (2021). Static and Treatment-Responsive Brain Biomarkers of Depression Recurrence Following Prophylactic Psychotherapy. Biological Psychiatry, 89(9), S36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.02.107

Cognitive behavioural therapy enhances compensatory neural circuitry in obsessive compulsive disorder

European Neuropsychopharmacology / Oct 01, 2016

Ravindran, A., Richter, M., Jain, T., Ravindran, L., Rector, N., & Farb, N. (2016). Cognitive behavioural therapy enhances compensatory neural circuitry in obsessive compulsive disorder. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 26, S621–S622. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0924-977x(16)31709-6

Presenilin genes in Alzheimer's diseases

Biological Psychiatry / Jul 01, 1997

Rogaev, E. I. (1997). Presenilin genes in Alzheimer’s diseases. Biological Psychiatry, 42(1), 210S-211S. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0006-3223(97)87778-5

Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: Reappraisal and Acceptance of Negative Self-beliefs

Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging / Jan 01, 2020

Dixon, M. L., Moodie, C. A., Goldin, P. R., Farb, N., Heimberg, R. G., & Gross, J. J. (2020). Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: Reappraisal and Acceptance of Negative Self-beliefs. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, 5(1), 119–129. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bpsc.2019.07.009

A two-factor model of relapse/recurrence vulnerability in unipolar depression.

Journal of Abnormal Psychology / Feb 01, 2015

Farb, N. A. S., Irving, J. A., Anderson, A. K., & Segal, Z. V. (2015). A two-factor model of relapse/recurrence vulnerability in unipolar depression. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 124(1), 38–53. https://doi.org/10.1037/abn0000031

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K. Suzanne Scherf

Associate Professor of Psychology & Neuroscience, Penn State University
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biological Psychiatry
Other Research Expertise (35)
developmental cognitive neuroscience
vision
autism
adolescent
Cognitive Neuroscience
And 30 more
About
My core interests lie in understanding how children and adolescents perceive and interpret social signals and how emerging functional specificity of the developing brain supports this process. My approach primarily involves using the face processing system as a model domain. Faces are dynamic stimuli from which we extract many different kinds of information (e.g., gender, age, emotional state, mate potential, social status, trustworthiness, intentions, “person knowledge”). All of these processes must be executed accurately and rapidly for many faces over the course of a single day, making face processing among the most taxing perceptual challenges confronted by people in their day-to-day life. Given that faces are also the pre-eminent social signal, studying developmental changes in the behavioral and brain basis of face processing in typically developing individuals and in those affected by social-emotional disorders may index a core set of developmental changes within the broader social information processing system. I employ converging methodologies, including functional (fMRI) and structural magnetic resonance, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) along with detailed behavioral paradigms in both typically developing populations and those with developmental disorders to examine development from early childhood to adulthood.
Most Relevant Publications (2+)

79 total publications

A typical Development of Face-Related Activation in Autism

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience / Jan 01, 2009

Suzy, S. (2009). A typical Development of Face-Related Activation in Autism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 3. https://doi.org/10.3389/conf.neuro.09.2009.10.005

Location, location, location: alterations in the functional topography of face- but not object- or place-related cortex in adolescents with autism

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience / Jan 01, 2010

Scherf. (2010). Location, location, location: alterations in the functional topography of face- but not object- or place-related cortex in adolescents with autism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2010.00026

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Example biological psychiatry projects

How can companies collaborate more effectively with researchers, experts, and thought leaders to make progress on biological psychiatry?

Developing Personalized Treatment Approaches

By collaborating with a Biological Psychiatry expert, companies can develop personalized treatment approaches for mental health disorders. These approaches can take into account individual genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors to tailor interventions that are more effective and targeted.

Advancing Neuroimaging Techniques

Biological Psychiatry researchers can contribute to the advancement of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). These techniques can provide valuable insights into the neural mechanisms underlying mental health disorders and help in the development of new diagnostic tools and treatment strategies.

Exploring the Gut-Brain Axis

The gut-brain axis is an emerging area of research in Biological Psychiatry. Collaborating with experts in this field can help companies explore the relationship between gut microbiota and mental health. This knowledge can lead to the development of novel interventions targeting the gut microbiome for the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

Investigating the Role of Epigenetics

Epigenetics plays a crucial role in the development and progression of mental health disorders. Academic researchers in Biological Psychiatry can investigate the epigenetic mechanisms underlying these disorders and identify potential therapeutic targets. Companies can benefit from such collaborations by gaining insights into the role of epigenetics in mental health and developing epigenetic-based therapies.

Designing Digital Therapeutics

Digital therapeutics, such as smartphone apps and virtual reality programs, have the potential to revolutionize mental health care. By collaborating with experts in Biological Psychiatry, companies can design and develop evidence-based digital therapeutics that can be used as adjunctive treatments or standalone interventions for mental health disorders.