Work with thought leaders and academic experts in biotechnology

Companies can greatly benefit from working with experts in the field of Biotechnology. These researchers bring a wealth of knowledge and experience that can help companies develop innovative products and solutions. Here are some ways companies can collaborate with academic researchers in Biotechnology: 1. Research and Development: Academic researchers can contribute to the development of new technologies, processes, and products. They can provide valuable insights and expertise in areas such as genetic engineering, drug discovery, and bioinformatics. 2. Problem Solving: Companies facing specific challenges or problems can collaborate with academic researchers to find solutions. Researchers can apply their scientific knowledge and analytical skills to address complex issues and develop effective strategies. 3. Access to Resources: Academic researchers often have access to state-of-the-art facilities, equipment, and resources. Companies can leverage these resources to conduct experiments, analyze data, and accelerate their research and development processes. 4. Intellectual Property: Collaborating with academic researchers can lead to the creation of intellectual property. Companies can benefit from patents, copyrights, and other forms of intellectual property rights that arise from joint research projects. 5. Talent Acquisition: By collaborating with academic researchers, companies can identify and recruit top talent in the field of Biotechnology. This can help companies build a strong research team and stay ahead of the competition.

Researchers on NotedSource with backgrounds in biotechnology include Dr. Sakshi Kabra Malpani, Dushani L. Palliyaguru, Ph.D., Mohammad Imran Khan, John M Baust, Ph.D, Michael W Harman, Dr. Fantai Kong, Ph.D., Fatemeh Nematollahi, and Aayudh Das, Ph.D..

Dr. Sakshi Kabra Malpani

Redmond, Washington, United States of America
Researcher with 10+ years expertise in Organic Chemistry, Solid Waste Management, Heterogeneous Catalysis.
Research Expertise (6)
Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
Materials Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
Pollution
And 1 more
About
Hello, I am Sakshi Kabra Malpani, with 10+ years of experience as a green, organic chemist and lecturer. My overarching research interests revolve around solid waste management, utilization of industrial and natural wastes in the development of heterogeneous catalysts, and their further utilization in different industrially viable organic transformations, extraction of various useful metal oxides like silica, alumina from such wastes. I favor interdisciplinary approaches to solve the aforesaid issues and have incorporated synthetic green chemistry as well as material science and conventional organic chemistry approaches in my research. Post Ph.D., I continued my research work at my workplaces in the form of different student projects at college and postgraduate levels. I also describe my interest and activities in science communication. Three of my designed catalysts have been patented on my name, my research work got published in peer-reviewed journals and books, also I presented my results at different international and national conferences. My father was a College Lecturer, so, from the early stages of my life, I want to become a teacher, saying teaching is in my DNA. Stepping to freelance consulting job, I would like to use my novel training as both an organic and environmental chemist, to investigate environmental processes on a range of temporal and spatial scales. I understand being a scientist or researcher does not mean just being successful in research. At the same time, one should be excellent in his/her interactions with the community and the students, in his/her role to lead the academic society, and in responsibilities to transform the community and society. To this end, I have been engaged in several volunteer activities, such as a volunteer in National Service Scheme and Teach For India movement, guiding and encouraging students to apply for further studies, research fellowships, competitive exams.

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Dushani L. Palliyaguru, Ph.D.

Baltimore, MD, Maryland, United States of America
Toxicologist | Aging, Nutrition and Metabolism Research Scientist | Systems Biologist
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biotechnology
Other Research Expertise (16)
Nutrition
aging
Oncology
Hematology
Molecular Biology
And 11 more
About
·   Highly productive scientist with 13 years of multidisciplinary experience in toxicology, molecular nutrition, and aging/ disease biomarkers ·   Excellent communicator with proven record of advanced writing and presentation skills - manuscripts, conference presentations, and grants ·   Extensive experience in large study design, supervision and coordination, big data analysis, and management of junior scientists
Most Relevant Publications (3+)

20 total publications

Isothiocyanates: Translating the Power of Plants to People

Molecular Nutrition & Food Research / Mar 26, 2018

Palliyaguru, D. L., Yuan, J.-M., Kensler, T. W., & Fahey, J. W. (2018). Isothiocyanates: Translating the Power of Plants to People. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 62(18), 1700965. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201700965

Withania somnifera : From prevention to treatment of cancer

Molecular Nutrition & Food Research / Jan 29, 2016

Palliyaguru, D. L., Singh, S. V., & Kensler, T. W. (2016). Withania somnifera : From prevention to treatment of cancer. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 60(6), 1342–1353. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201500756

Evaluation of 2-Thiothiazolidine-4-Carboxylic Acid, a Common Metabolite of Isothiocyanates, as a Potential Biomarker of Cruciferous Vegetable Intake

Molecular Nutrition & Food Research / Nov 22, 2018

Palliyaguru, D. L., Salvatore, S. R., Schopfer, F. J., Cheng, X., Zhou, J., Kensler, T. W., & Wendell, S. G. (2018). Evaluation of 2-Thiothiazolidine-4-Carboxylic Acid, a Common Metabolite of Isothiocyanates, as a Potential Biomarker of Cruciferous Vegetable Intake. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 63(3), 1801029. Portico. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201801029

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Mohammad Imran Khan

College Park, Maryland, United States of America
Postdoctoral Associate at University of Maryland College Park in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biotechnology
Other Research Expertise (22)
Biomedical Engineering
Nanotechology
Wound healing
Infection and Immunity
Bioengineering
And 17 more
About
Research work is focused on the formulation of nanoparticles encapsulated materials which could be useful for tissue engineering, stem cells, drug delivery and biomechanics to create biologically inspired tissue and organ constructs. Furthermore, 3D material may play significant role in the healing of complex tissues and organs in vitro and in vivo.
Most Relevant Publications (3+)

11 total publications

Facile bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by using extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa and evaluation of its cytotoxicity against U87 glioblastoma cells under hyperglycemic condition

Biochemical Engineering Journal / Jan 01, 2016

Mishra, P., Ray, S., Sinha, S., Das, B., Khan, Md. I., Behera, S. K., Yun, S.-I., Tripathy, S. K., & Mishra, A. (2016). Facile bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by using extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa and evaluation of its cytotoxicity against U87 glioblastoma cells under hyperglycemic condition. Biochemical Engineering Journal, 105, 264–272. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bej.2015.09.021

Cytotoxic Potential of Biogenic Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized From Swertia chirayita Leaf Extract on Colorectal Cancer Cells

Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology / Dec 15, 2021

Berehu, H. M., S, A., Khan, M. I., Chakraborty, R., Lavudi, K., Penchalaneni, J., Mohapatra, B., Mishra, A., & Patnaik, S. (2021). Cytotoxic Potential of Biogenic Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Synthesized From Swertia chirayita Leaf Extract on Colorectal Cancer Cells. Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, 9. https://doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2021.788527

Biogenic Ag/CaO nanocomposites kill Staphylococcus aureus with reduced toxicity towards mammalian cells

Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces / May 01, 2020

Khan, M. I., Mazumdar, A., Pathak, S., Paul, P., Kumar Behera, S., Tamhankar, A. J., Tripathy, S. K., Stålsby Lundborg, C., & Mishra, A. (2020). Biogenic Ag/CaO nanocomposites kill Staphylococcus aureus with reduced toxicity towards mammalian cells. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 189, 110846. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2020.110846

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John M Baust, Ph.D

Ithaca, New York, United States of America
Proven success in delivering best-in-class services across scientific, commercial and education environments.
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biotechnology
Other Research Expertise (16)
Cell Biology
Biomedical Engineering
Transplantation
Surgery
Management of Technology and Innovation
And 11 more
About
***Proven success in delivering best-in-class services across highly regulated scientific and commercial environments.*** * Resourceful, dynamic, and future-focused professional; equipped with strategic leadership, business, research, and academic expertise with career excellence in conducting in-depth research, leading multi-faceted R&D projects, and developing new products and treatments. * Dedicated, driven self-starter focused on developing innovative life changing technologies and procedures advancing the areas of cancer treatment, regenerative medicine and cell therapy.   * Substantial experience in providing oversight for medical device development, pre-clinical studies, cancer therapy, stem cell preservation, cell therapy, tissue engineering, and organ transplantation, etc. * Astute at establishing solid relationships with stakeholders and industry leaders to drive innovative ideas and lead collaborative efforts in pursuit of accomplishing long-term milestones. * Successful in delivering interactive academic instruction across higher education settings offering captivating lectures on Biology and Entrepreneurship courses in accordance with the organizational mission. * Accredited with authoring, managing, and executing multi-million dollar grants, corporate contracts * Accomplished author of numerous patents and high profile publications to disseminate essential research findings.
Most Relevant Publications (12+)

68 total publications

Molecular Mechanisms of Cellular Demise Associated with Cryopreservation Failure

Cell Preservation Technology / May 01, 2002

Baust, J. M. (2002). Molecular Mechanisms of Cellular Demise Associated with Cryopreservation Failure. Cell Preservation Technology, 1(1), 17–31. https://doi.org/10.1089/15383440260073266

Gene Activation of the Apoptotic Caspase Cascade Following Cryogenic Storage

Cell Preservation Technology / May 01, 2002

Baust, J. M., Van Buskirk, R., & Baust, J. G. (2002). Gene Activation of the Apoptotic Caspase Cascade Following Cryogenic Storage. Cell Preservation Technology, 1(1), 63–80. https://doi.org/10.1089/15383440260073301

Transplantation Diagnostics: A Preliminary Analysis Using Protein Microarray to Determine Kidney Status Prior To and Following Implantation

Cell Preservation Technology / Jun 01, 2004

Baust, J. M., Mathew, A. J., Snyder, K. K., Liu, E. H., van Buskirk, R. G., Hardy, M. A., & Baust, J. G. (2004). Transplantation Diagnostics: A Preliminary Analysis Using Protein Microarray to Determine Kidney Status Prior To and Following Implantation. Cell Preservation Technology, 2(2), 81–90. https://doi.org/10.1089/153834404774101936

Cellular Components of the Coronary Vasculature Exhibit Differential Sensitivity to Low Temperature Insult

Cell Preservation Technology / Dec 01, 2002

Hollister, W. R., Baust, J. M., Van Buskirk, R. G., & Baust, J. G. (2002). Cellular Components of the Coronary Vasculature Exhibit Differential Sensitivity to Low Temperature Insult. Cell Preservation Technology, 1(4), 269–280. https://doi.org/10.1089/15383440260682099

Effect of Cell Substrate Interactions on the Desiccation Behavior of Human Fibroblasts

Cell Preservation Technology / Sep 01, 2004

Baust, J. M., Fowler, A., & Toner, M. (2004). Effect of Cell Substrate Interactions on the Desiccation Behavior of Human Fibroblasts. Cell Preservation Technology, 2(3), 188–197. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpt.2004.2.188

Enhanced Hypothermic Storage of Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

Cell Preservation Technology / Mar 01, 2005

Snyder, K. K., Baust, J. M., Van Buskirk, R. G., & Baust, J. G. (2005). Enhanced Hypothermic Storage of Neonatal Cardiomyocytes. Cell Preservation Technology, 3(1), 61–74. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpt.2005.3.61

Involvement of the Cysteine Protease Calpain Family in Cell Death After Cryopreservation

Cell Preservation Technology / Mar 01, 2006

Robilotto, A. T., Baust, J. M., Buskirk, R. V., & Baust, J. G. (2006). Involvement of the Cysteine Protease Calpain Family in Cell Death After Cryopreservation. Cell Preservation Technology, 4(1), 17–30. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpt.2006.4.17

Bioprocessing

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News / Feb 01, 2013

Bioprocessing. (2013). Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, 33(3), 28–28. https://doi.org/10.1089/gen.33.3.16

Cardiomyocyte Responses to Thermal Excursions: Implications for Electrophysiological Cardiac Mapping

Cell Preservation Technology / Jun 01, 2007

Snyder, K. K., Baust, J. M., Van Buskirk, R. G., & Baust, J. G. (2007). Cardiomyocyte Responses to Thermal Excursions: Implications for Electrophysiological Cardiac Mapping. Cell Preservation Technology, 5(2), 116–128. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpt.2007.9995

Activation of Mitochondrial-Associated Apoptosis Contributes to Cryopreservation Failure

Cell Preservation Technology / Sep 01, 2007

Baust, J. M., Vogel, M. J., Snyder, K. K., Van Buskirk, R. G., & Baust, J. G. (2007). Activation of Mitochondrial-Associated Apoptosis Contributes to Cryopreservation Failure. Cell Preservation Technology, 5(3), 155–164. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpt.2007.9990

Preliminary Report: Evaluation of Storage Conditions and Cryococktails during Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Cryopreservation

Cell Preservation Technology / Dec 01, 2007

Cosentino, L. M., Corwin, W., Baust, J. M., Diaz-Mayoral, N., Cooley, H., Shao, W., van Buskirk, R., & Baust, J. G. (2007). Preliminary Report: Evaluation of Storage Conditions and Cryococktails during Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Cryopreservation. Cell Preservation Technology, 5(4), 189–204. https://doi.org/10.1089/cpt.2007.9987

Biobanking Expands into Research Services

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News / May 01, 2018

Raper, V. (2018). Biobanking Expands into Research Services. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, 38(9), 1, 22–24. https://doi.org/10.1089/gen.38.09.01

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Fatemeh Nematollahi

Los Angeles, California, United States of America
AI Research Scientist with Ph.D in Physics
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biotechnology
Other Research Expertise (4)
Condensed Matter Physics
Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
Electrical and Electronic Engineering
About
Fatemeh Nematollahi is a highly accomplished physicist with a strong educational background and extensive experience in the field. She received her Ph.D. in Physics from Georgia State University (GSU) in 2019, where she specialized in the study of solids in ultrafast laser pulse. During her postdoctoral at GSU, she continued to study the interaction of solids in an external ultrafast pulse. After that, she joined the Radiation Oncology Department at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) as a postdoctoral. She applied deep learning to predict a dose for breast cancer treatment. In addition to her academic work, Fatemeh has also gained valuable industry experience as a Research Scientist at Intellisense Systems, Inc, a company specializing in advanced sensing and communication technologies. Here, she worked in the AI and RF group to develop advanced systems. She has published numerous papers in prestigious scientific journals and has presented her work at international conferences. She is also a member of several professional organizations, including the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fatemeh's passion for physics and her drive to push the boundaries of knowledge in the field make her a valuable asset to any research team. She is dedicated, hardworking, and always seeking new challenges and opportunities to expand her skills and knowledge.
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

7 total publications

TMDC-Based Topological Nanospaser: Single and Double Threshold Behavior

ACS Photonics / Feb 26, 2021

Ghimire, R., Nematollahi, F., Wu, J.-S., Apalkov, V., & Stockman, M. I. (2021). TMDC-Based Topological Nanospaser: Single and Double Threshold Behavior. ACS Photonics, 8(3), 907–915. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsphotonics.0c01919

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Aayudh Das, Ph.D.

Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America
Scientist at Garuda therapeutics, specialized in Genomics and Computational Biology
Most Relevant Research Expertise
Biotechnology
Other Research Expertise (14)
Transcriptomics
Genomics
Proteomics
Computational Biology
Metabolomics
And 9 more
About
I am a dedicated Scientist-I at Garuda Therapeutics, where I specialize in computational biology and genomics within the R&D department. My work primarily revolves around developing and optimizing pipelines for variant calling using Strelka2 and GATK4 with Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) to identify oncogenes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This involves extensive work in the qualification and validation of these pipelines for regulatory filings, as well as leveraging databases such as ClinVar, COSMIC, and DepMap to craft targeted oncogenes panels for deep sequencing. I also apply Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) for downstream sequencing to validate CRISPR knockouts, including the identification and validation of CRISPR off-targets using techniques like rhAMPseq and Induce-seq. Additionally, my expertise extends to single-cell sequencing analysis and understanding structural variants with Optical Genome Mapping (Bionano). Prior to joining Garuda Therapeutics, I completed a postdoctoral fellowship in computational biology at Pennsylvania State University, where I honed my skills in identifying climate-adaptive variants and conducted Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) to uncover resistance genes against parasites and other stressors. My academic journey began at the University of Vermont, where I explored abiotic stress resistance genes using transcriptomics and developed a robust understanding of RNA-seq data analysis, from assembly to gene annotation. My work is driven by a passion for leveraging computational and genomics tools to address pressing challenges in biology and healthcare, combining my rigorous academic training with a practical, solution-oriented approach to research and development.
Most Relevant Publications (1+)

10 total publications

Investigation of the Cardiotonic Steroids, Marinobufagenin and Resibufogenin, in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

The FASEB Journal / Apr 01, 2016

Abbas, M. M. K., Chen, Q., Das, A., Oliver, J., Jiang, W., Moorthy, B., Patel, B., Morin, K., & Puschett, J. (2016). Investigation of the Cardiotonic Steroids, Marinobufagenin and Resibufogenin, in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. The FASEB Journal, 30(S1). Portico. https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.30.1_supplement.982.4

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Example biotechnology projects

How can companies collaborate more effectively with researchers, experts, and thought leaders to make progress on biotechnology?

Development of Novel Therapeutics

A pharmaceutical company can collaborate with a Biotechnology researcher to develop novel therapeutics for various diseases. The researcher's expertise in molecular biology and drug discovery can help identify potential drug targets and design effective treatments.

Bioprocess Optimization

A biotech company can partner with an academic researcher to optimize bioprocesses for the production of biofuels or biopharmaceuticals. The researcher's knowledge in fermentation, metabolic engineering, and process optimization can help improve yields and reduce production costs.

Genetic Engineering for Crop Improvement

An agricultural company can collaborate with a Biotechnology expert to develop genetically modified crops with improved traits, such as disease resistance or increased yield. The researcher's expertise in genetic engineering and plant biotechnology can contribute to the development of sustainable and high-yielding crop varieties.

Bioinformatics Analysis

A healthcare company can work with a Biotechnology researcher skilled in bioinformatics to analyze large-scale genomic and proteomic data. The researcher's expertise in data analysis and interpretation can help identify biomarkers, understand disease mechanisms, and develop personalized medicine approaches.

Environmental Remediation

An environmental consulting firm can collaborate with a Biotechnology researcher to develop innovative solutions for environmental remediation. The researcher's knowledge in bioremediation, microbial ecology, and environmental monitoring can help address pollution and contamination issues.